NEWS: Ford von Johannes Paul II. wird versteigert

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eröffnet am: 09.05.05 15:25 von: C.Webb4 Anzahl Beiträge: 7
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09.05.05 15:25

4784 Postings, 7196 Tage C.Webb4NEWS: Ford von Johannes Paul II. wird versteigert

PAPST-AUTO

Ford von Johannes Paul II. wird versteigert

In Las Vegas wird das einzige Auto des verstorbenen Papstes Johannes Pauls II. versteigert. Gegen den Wert des blauen Fords nimmt sich der des kürzlich versteigerten Ratzinger-Golfs beinahe bescheiden aus: Der jetzige Besitzer rechnet bei der Auktion mit einem Millionengewinn.

Ford Escort von 1975: Die blaue Variante fuhr Karol Wojtyla - nun wird sie versteigert
Großbildansicht
Ford Escort von 1975: Die blaue Variante fuhr Karol Wojtyla - nun wird sie versteigert
Auburn - Der blaue Ford Escort GL von 1975 soll dem Geschäftsmann Jim Rich aus Illinois geschätzte fünf Millionen Dollar einbringen. Rich hatte den Wagen 1996 für 102.000 Dollar ersteigert.

Er erinnere sich noch gut an den Tag, an dem Johannes Paul ihm den Wagen übergeben habe, sagte Rich. "Ich gab ihm den Scheck, und er gab mir die Schlüssel", erklärte er. "Ich habe ihn gefragt, ob ich ein Foto von ihm mit den Schlüsseln machen könnte, und er hat gelacht." Mit dem Geld finanzierte Karol Wojtyla den Ausbau eines Hauses für polnische Pilger in Rom, Stipendien und die Erweiterung der Katholischen Universität im polnischen Lublin. Der Papst fuhr mit dem Ford mehr als 100.000 Kilometer, Rich fügte noch einige hinzu. Er überlegt noch, ob er den päpstlichen Rosenkranz, den er mit dem Auto übernahm, behalten wollte.

Der Auktionator Jim Kruse erklärte, der Ford Escort könnte am 3. und 4. Juni im Hotel Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas sogar noch mehr als fünf Millionen Dollar einbringen. Ohne den päpstlichen Vorbesitzer wäre der Wagen nach seiner Schätzung höchstens 1200 Dollar wert. Von einem Vatikan-Mitarbeiter habe er gehört, dass Johannes Paul gern in unauffälliger Kleidung aus dem Vatikan geschlichen sei, um eine Spritztour zu unternehmen, sagte Kruse.

Päpstliche Vorbesitzer erhöhen den Wert eines Wagens um ein Vielfaches: Ein sechs Jahre alter Golf, der Johannes Pauls Nachfolger Benedikt XVI. gehörte, brachte in der vergangenen Woche bei einer Auktion fast 190.000 Euro ein.


http://www.spiegel.de/auto/aktuell/0,1518,355249,00.html

;-)))  

09.05.05 15:26


A.N.
(vincit sedendo)


Eine findet statt.

 

09.05.05 15:30

30091 Postings, 5865 Tage ScontovalutaDer ist mal

bei uns umme Ecke, da hab ich ihn geknipst:  
Angehängte Grafik:
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TaunusTtT.JPG

09.05.05 15:31

30091 Postings, 5865 Tage ScontovalutaMan beachte das poln. Kennzeichen! o. T.

09.05.05 15:36

26159 Postings, 6272 Tage AbsoluterNeulingDas ist das Vatikan-Kennzeichen für...

Karol "Urbi et orbi" Wojtyla. Erstzulassung 07/'54

A.N.
(vincit sedendo)


Eine findet statt.

 

09.05.05 16:14

30091 Postings, 5865 Tage ScontovalutaFahrräder,

da müsste doch auch das ein oder andere aufzutreiben sein...  
Angehängte Grafik:
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Papstrad.JPG

09.05.05 19:03

4784 Postings, 7196 Tage C.Webb4Es geht weiter

Pope's baseball card hits eBay
Posted: Monday May 9, 2005 12:32PM; Updated: Monday May 9, 2005 12:32PM

NEW YORK (AP) -- The sports trading card generating the most buzz among collectors right now doesn't feature a baseball, basketball or football player. This captivating athlete was a soccer goalie who also liked skiing, swimming, hiking and kayaking.

His name: Pope John Paul II.

A one-of-a-kind card featuring the pontiff's autograph was released earlier this year by Topps, the best known maker of baseball cards. When the pope died last month, collectors wondered whether anyone had found the card and what it might fetch in a marketplace suddenly sizzling for all things John Paul.

The location has been determined. A collector in Stockton, Calif., beat 1-in-135,475 odds and plucked the pope rarity out of a $1.50 pack of otherwise ordinary baseball cards about two weeks before the pontiff died. The day before the pope's funeral, he sold the card to Jeff Hoekstra, the manager of a collectibles store in nearby Modesto.

How much is it worth? That's what Hoekstra is trying to find out.

He paid into four figures for the card, then immediately took it to eBay seeking a hefty profit. His first auction closed at $8,100 but the sale fell through, so he offered it up again for $6,999 but got no takers. His third try began Sunday and expires next Sunday. Like the first time, he started bidding at a penny and will take whatever he can get.

Hoekstra said his first posting drew so much interest within the first hour that "if someone had offered $15,000, I would not have taken it. ... I thought I could get about $25,000 or $30,000."

Now, however, "my thinking is, day by day, this card is getting less and less valuable," said Hoekstra, who is 32 and not Catholic.

While the card's value may be dropping, interest in it remains high.

It's on the cover of the upcoming issue of Beckett Baseball, a leading trade publication, and many media outlets reported the $8,100 "sale" last week. Hoekstra's initial eBay posting has drawn 13,400 hits, with more than 600 coming since the auction closed; by comparison, the most hits he'd ever received previously was around 500 for a rare Michael Jordan card.

"The lure of this card is very much his recent death and the fact the pope was an extremely popular world leader," Beckett Baseball editor Mike Payne said. "Even if he was still living, I think the card would bring a significant figure."

Why Topps even made a pope card is a story itself.

About a decade ago, card makers rejuvenated their industry by putting "inserts" into a limited number of packages. The prizes had natural tie-ins, like autographs and pieces of jerseys and bats. Topps stretched the boundaries last year with cards featuring autographs of every U.S. president.

Since George Washington isn't around to give his John Hancock, Topps used "cut signatures" -- autographs cut out and embedded into a card. While historians might be horrified, it's an accepted, authenticated practice. And collectors love it.

So Topps responded with two sets this year: the 48-card World Treasures collection featuring a lineup of historical heavy hitters such as the pope, Napoleon Bonaparte and Winston Churchill; and a 51-card Power Brokers series that ranges from John Paul Getty and P.T. Barnum to Thomas Edison, Martin Luther King Jr. and Helen Keller.

"By taking autographs of some of the most famous people who have ever lived, it really attracts new collectors," Topps spokesman Clay Luraschi said. "That's our biggest thing. We want to bring people into the hobby."

The cards actually are pretty bland. There's no picture, just the autograph on the front and a short bio on the back. The pope's autograph looks like "J P II," a shortened version of his full signature, "Joannes Paulus II."

The pope card was "pulled," as traders say, from a box of 36 packs, said Jerry Schoolcraft, owner of Big Valley Collectibles, who unknowingly sold it. He said the lucky buyer was an infrequent customer who recently resumed collecting.

"He came back and had it in a baggie. He said, `Is this a good card?"' Schoolcraft said. "I told him if he wanted to sell, now was the time. It wasn't the kind of card to hold onto forever and ever."

Why would anyone pay so much for it, especially when a pope-signed, official Vatican photo of John Paul and Mother Teresa recently went for $1,750 on eBay?

"Really, it's about bragging rights," Payne said. "You can buy a pope autograph cheaper, but Mr. Deep Pockets wants this one."

Copyright 2005 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.  

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